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The Oxmoor Ford GT Competition Series Looks Like A No-Frills Ferrari Killer

Oxmoor Ford Lincoln

All images by Ford

Ford just released pictures of their new Ford GT Competition Series, a lightweight, track-focused version of their already bonkers supercar, and it looks every bit as purposeful and menacing as it should to sway the minds and wallets of the fickle supercar buying public.

The Competition Series is Ford GT’s answer to boutique track-day versions of popular supercars such as the Porsche 911 GT3 RS and Lamborghini Huracan Performante.

The GT Competition Series features air conditioning and radio deletes, bare carbon in the door sills, dashboard and exterior stripes, carbon fiber wheels with matching titanium lug nuts, and titanium exhaust tips. You can read the more complete list of specs here.

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Aluminum vs. Steel: 2015 Ford F150 vs. 2015 Chevrolet Silverado 1500 vs. 2015 Ram Trucks 1500 vs. 2014 Toyota Tundra.

As any dime-store undergrad psych major can tell you, it’s a tough climb to the top of the hierarchy of needs pyramid, the point at which we supposedly have everything we desire. There are challenges at every level, from finding solid traction in the physiological realm to cresting the summit of self-actualization. Any base full-size pickup truck has the capability to get you there, but if you’ve got around $60,000 to spend, why settle for anything less than total fulfillment in a crew-cab, four-wheel-drive, luxury salon on stilts?

So the dean of the needs hierarchy himself, Abraham Maslow, is in the metaphorical driver’s seat for this comparison of top-of-the-line, half-ton personality haulers. Of course, Chevrolet and Ford are here, as are Ram and Toyota.

Click below to see entire article:

http://bit.ly/15XxEx0

See today at Oxmoor Ford Lincoln in Louisville KY.  Oxmoor Ford is part of the Oxmoor Auto Group, including Oxmoor Toyota, Oxmoor Mazda, Oxmoor Chrysler and Oxmoor Hyundai.

 

2017 Oxmoor FORD F-150 RAPTOR FIRST TEST

2017 Ford F 150 Raptor front three quarters

Oxmoor Ford F-150 Raptor

The F-150’s cooking-grade 3.5-liter EcoBoost V-6 puts down 375 hp and 470 lb-ft of torque, and the departed 6.2-liter V-8 pushed out 411 hp and 434 lb-ft. But at 450 hp and 510 lb-ft, the Raptor boasts a healthy margin over both. It’s a big contrast from when the original SVT Raptor came to market in 2009—when buyers received a 310-hp Triton 5.4-liter V-8 with three valves per cylinder. That experiment lasted only a year. We expect this generation will have no such stage fright.

The new Raptor certainly causes a commotion. With a distinctive, deep bellow (credit the unique dual exhaust setup), the truck sounds fast—and it is. With the new combination all-/four-wheel-drive system dialed to 4A (automatic 4×4), the Terrain Management System set to Sport (the other modes are Normal, Weather, Mud/Sand, Baja, and Rock/Crawl), the stability control turned off, and the transmission left in drive, the Raptor efficiently put its power down without a lick of wheelspin on its way to 60 mph in a thundering 5.2 seconds. As you pin your right foot to the firewall, you feel the engagement of each gear shift on the way to clipping the quarter mile in 13.9 seconds at 97.3 mph. By breaking into the 13s, this truck stands head and shoulders above any bygone SVT Raptor—the fleetest of which nailed 60 in 6.5 seconds and completed the quarter mile in 15.1 seconds at 91.3 mph.

 

2017 Ford F 150 Raptor interior view 02

Oxmoor Ford

 

It’s a lot of power for a lot of truck, but the Raptor manages itself well in varied circumstances. In the Ocotillo Wells area in the Southern California desert, Ford drew out a 50-odd-mile course through narrow trails, deep ruts, sandy tracks, and wide-open washes. To settle the truck in this environment, and to calm down the rear end in particular, the tire pressures were knocked down from the on-road recommended 38 psi all around to 28 psi up front and 23 psi in the rear. The route served to highlight the suspension’s control and the grip of the 315/70R17 BFGoodrich All-Terrain T/A KO2 tires. It also highlighted the Raptor’s thirstiness: The 26-gallon fuel tank’s gauge needle dropped from three-quarters full to just above one-quarter after one pass. The EPA fuel economy numbers may have upgraded to 15/18/16 mpg city/highway/combined from the 2014 SVT Raptor’s 12/16/13 but the new truck will still go down into the single digits if you’re on the gas enough.

The upshot is you can chase your buddy’s Trophy Truck during the Baja 1000 faster than before. The Raptor can top out at a bit over 100 mph if the terrain is packed solid enough and sending the right signals, but in the always-uncertain off-road environs, you spend most of your time assessing the truck’s feedback. Different earth surfaces elicit an array of driver responses. One moment you’re burying the accelerator to preserve momentum in soft sand. The next you’re hunting for the zone where the truck flies nice and level, where one more mile per hour merely leads to greater fidgeting with the steering wheel.

2017 Ford F 150 Raptor interior view 02

2017 Ford F 150 Raptor overhead controls 12017 Ford F 150 Raptor interior 12017 Ford F 150 Raptor gear shifter 12017 Ford F 150 Raptor engine 1

The Raptor makes for easy reading of the topography. The most violent high-frequency washboards feel like they’ll shake your kidneys loose, but the coil springs in the front corners and leaf springs in back, paired with Fox’s nine-stage bypass shock absorbers and BFG rubber, keep the suspension feeling limber. The nine stages refer to internal damping regions that respond according to how brutal the tires are being hit – five within the compression zone and four for rebound. Bonus: It’s a much more comfortable truck on-road than the one other 2017 F-150 (a Platinum 4×4) we’ve tested to date.

Four years ago, we praised the last SVT Raptor we tested for its steering precision. (For a trip down memory lane, change the YouTube channel to Head 2 Head episode 14, “Ford Raptor vs. Ram Runner!”) A trait that’s often the first to vanish when the words “truck,” “lift,” and “big tires” appear in the same sentence, the Raptor’s front-end accuracy was surprisingly apparent from the moment the steering wheel was turned. The excellent initial response on road imbues a sense of playfulness in the 86.3-inch-wide monster, but road holding is ultimately stunted by the KO2s, which only generate 0.71g lateral grip (matching the old Raptor). But it’s hard to fault the lack of stickiness in tires that are also tasked with slinging hectares of mud and snow. At least our figure-eight time improved, lowering the Raptor’s all-time best lap from 29.3 to 28.2 seconds.

Yes, the truck can still be launched into the air (within reason) with wheels in full droop, and it’ll land without drama and then continue to go about its business. We’ve been waiting four years to experience this again in a Raptor. There’s a heroic sensation to being flung vertically within the driver’s seat as a truck easily eats up the landscape. It makes you want to take the long road to wherever you are going.

2017 Ford F-150 Raptor
BASE PRICE $49,520
PRICE AS TESTED $62,335
VEHICLE LAYOUT Front-engine, 4WD, 5-pass, 2+2-door truck
ENGINE 3.5L/450-hp/510-lb-ft twin-turbo DOHC 24-valve V-6
TRANSMISSION 10-speed automatic
CURB WEIGHT (F/R DIST) 5,661 lb (55/45%)
WHEELBASE 134.2 in
LENGTH x WIDTH x HEIGHT 220.0 x 86.3 x 78.5 in
0-60 MPH 5.2 sec
QUARTER MILE 13.9 sec @ 97.3 mph
BRAKING, 60-0 MPH 140 ft
LATERAL ACCELERATION 0.71 g (avg)
MT FIGURE EIGHT 28.2 sec @ 0.60 g (avg)
EPA CITY/HWY/COMB FUEL ECON 15/18/16 mpg
ENERGY CONS, CITY/HWY 225/187 kW-hrs/100 miles
CO2 EMISSIONS, COMB 1.20 lb/mile

See today at Oxmoor Ford Lincoln in Louisville KY.  Oxmoor Ford is part of the Oxmoor Auto Group, including Oxmoor Toyota, Oxmoor Mazda, Oxmoor Chrysler and Oxmoor Hyundai.

Clash of the Crossovers: 2016 Honda CR-V vs. Mazda CX-5 vs. Jeep Cherokee

Oxmoor Auto Group’s Oxmoor Mazda CX-5 review and comparison!

Over the course of the week, I spent extensive time with the 2016 Honda CR-V, Mazda CX-5, and Jeep Cherokee to see which was best.

Over the course of the week, I spent extensive time with the 2016 Honda CR-V, Mazda CX-5, and Jeep Cherokee to see which was best.

Good, bad, or just plain indifferent, everyone’s got an opinion on the car world’s hottest segment: crossovers.

Every single automaker (with the exception of most supercar makers) has one, and they’re already planning on building more and more variants. But if you look at the facts, it’s not hard to see why.

Abundant space for all of your favorite people and things, ride and handling qualities (somewhat) consistent with a car, and a tendency to offer that all-important all-wheel drive are just some of the reasons Americans – and buyers all over the world, for that matter – are snatching up crossovers like hotcakes… or iPhones, I guess?

To see what all the fuss is about – though admittedly, we’ve driven plenty of crossovers here – I got behind the wheel of three of the most popular entrants in the small SUV segment. Over the course of the week, I spent extensive time with the 2016 Honda CR-V, Mazda CX-5, and Jeep Cherokee to see which was best, and more importantly, which is most worth your hard-earned money. Here’s how they fared:

3rd Place: 2016 Jeep Cherokee Altitude 4×4

Love or hate the… um… interesting front end, there’s no denying that this is an SUV with presence.

Love or hate the… um… interesting front end, there’s no denying that this is an SUV with presence.

My Cherokee tester for the week was the 4×4-equipped “Altitude” model, Jeep’s attempt to appeal to the many fans of blacked-out cars and SUVs. Gloss black rims, badges, grille outlines, and smoked out lights gave this gray Cherokee a sinister appearance.

Love or hate the… um… interesting front end, there’s no denying that this is an SUV with presence. I actually happen to like the looks, but I don’t think it should be attached to the vaunted “Cherokee” nameplate. But more on that later…

Unfortunately, this lovely engine is mated to Chrysler’s 9-speed automatic, an unruly and unpredictable attempt to improve fuel economy at the expense of several hairs pulled out.

Unfortunately, this lovely engine is mated to Chrysler’s 9-speed automatic, an unruly and unpredictable attempt to improve fuel economy at the expense of several hairs pulled out.

This particular Cherokee was fitted with the 3.2-liter V-6, a true peach of a power plant, though it does fall on the “old school” side of things. With 271-horsepower, there was more than enough get-up-and-go for city driving or merging on to the highway, and proved to be smooth as silk when cruising along… even if the gas mileage leaves a lot to be desired. But hey, at least gas is cheap right now!

Unfortunately, this lovely engine is mated to Chrysler’s 9-speed automatic, an unruly and unpredictable attempt to improve fuel economy at the expense of several hairs pulled out (figuratively speaking, of course).

The gearbox never could quite decide what gear it wanted to be in, and suffered from the same issue as the Range Rover Evoque, where the delay in downshifting could be downright dangerous when performing passing maneuvers.

The ride is sublimely smooth, and the Cherokee handles better than you might expect, but I couldn’t help but miss the boxy, utilitarian, truck-like character of the last model to wear the badge. Especially when it came to hauling gear, as this Jeep is painfully down on cargo room.

Factor in the massive sticker price – the $34,705 Cherokee was more expensive than the Honda and Mazda and didn’t even include navigation – and it becomes hard to recommend.

Overall, the Cherokee is a charming crossover – about as charming as a crossover can be – but is almost as un-practical as it is lovable. It’s hard to give it top marks when the other two entrants in this comparison offer so much more for the money.

Vital Stats: 2016 Jeep Cherokee Altitude 4×4

Price: $34,705 (as tested, incl. $995 dest. charge)

Powertrain: All-wheel drive; 3.2-liter V-6; 9-speed automatic

Power: 271-hp; 239 lb.-ft.

Fuel economy (mpg): 19 city/26 hwy./22 comb.

Safety: NHTSA 4-star overall

2nd Place: 2016 Honda CR-V AWD Touring

The Japanese brand’s best-selling crossover is all but ubiquitous on American roads – everybody knows somebody who owns or has owned a CR-V – and for many very good reasons.

The Japanese brand’s best-selling crossover is all but ubiquitous on American roads – everybody knows somebody who owns or has owned a CR-V – and for many very good reasons.

If the Cherokee embodies character, flaws and all, than the Honda CR-V is the Jeep’s perfect foil.

The Japanese brand’s best-selling crossover is all but ubiquitous on American roads – everybody knows somebody who owns or has owned a CR-V – and for many very good reasons.

My top-of-the-line CR-V Touring was extremely well equipped at $34,145, including everything from all-wheel drive to collision mitigation braking and lane departure warning with steering assist. The Touring model essentially checks all of the boxes, so LEDs, power driver’s seat, Bluetooth connectivity, navigation, dual-zone climate control, and a leather interior all come standard on the trim level.

The Touring model also includes Honda’s “LaneWatch” blind spot system in the place of a traditional blind spot monitoring system, which gives you a camera view of what’s on the right every time you use the right turn signal. There’s no camera on the left, though, nor a sensor. Instead, you’re left with a curved mirror that’s meant to show a wider view, but in reality, it’s a lot of over-the-shoulder glancing.

Cargo space is abundant, as Honda seems to have made it their modus operandi to boast the best volume in every segment, and the powertrain is perfectly adequate. The 185-horsepower 4-cylinder is enough to get by, and feels suited to the smart (if a bit lifeless) CVT.

In fact, I was impressed with the steering feel, and while the handling could be a bit tauter in the corners, this is no sports-‘ute.

Barring some minor quibbles like LaneWatch, the CR-V is a perfectly practical, extremely value-conscious crossover that deserves every bit of its sales champion crown. Except for one major flaw, that is.

After a week with the CR-V and over 600-miles, I walked away with one looming feeling above all others: boredom.

The Honda CR-V is as close as a car can be to an appliance, and while that’s perfectly fine for the majority of Americans, I can’t say I personally feel the same. In practice, the CR-V was an ideal car to take on a long road trip, if only because you don’t think about driving it, you just do.

That fact alone is what kept an otherwise excellent crossover from the top spot, as the winner does almost everything the CR-V does, but with more fun.

Vital Stats: 2016 Honda CR-V AWD Touring

Price: $34,145 (as tested, incl. $900 dest. charge)

Powertrain: All-wheel drive; 2.4-liter 4-cyl.; CVT

Power: 185-hp; 181 lb.-ft.

Fuel economy (mpg): 25 city/31 hwy./27 comb.

Safety: 5-star NHTSA overall; IIHS Top Safety Pick+

1st Place: 2016 Mazda CX-5 Grand Touring AWD

There are a few very good reasons this spunky red Mazda edged out the competition, and chief among them is driving engagement.

There are a few very good reasons this spunky red Mazda edged out the competition, and chief among them is driving engagement.

That’s right, Mazda tops one of our comparisons again. Color us surprised!

Jokes aside, there are a few very good reasons this spunky red crossover edged out the competition, and chief among them is driving engagement.

Powered by a 2.5-liter 4-cylinder that uses Mazda’s SKYACTIV high-compression technology, the CX-5 makes 185-horsepower. That’s not a number that will set anybody’s hair on fire at the drag strip, but when mated to the excellent 6-speed automatic transmission, it’s downright fun.

Though the CX-5 didn’t offer quite as much stuff as the Honda, it’s how all of that stuff is laid out in the cabin that sets it apart.

Steering feel is slightly on the lighter side, but this is a crossover after all. What’s important is that the CX-5 boasts a tighter steering ratio than the other two entrants, and that makes it as much fun to drive as cars with fewer doors and much lower ground clearances.

I often forgot I was driving a crossover when behind the wheel of the CX-5, which is about as good of a compliment as you can give a car-SUV hybrid in the golden age of the sports car.

At a sticker price of $32,640, the Mazda was the most affordable of the three, and though it didn’t offer quite as much stuff as the Honda, it’s how all of that stuff is laid out in the cabin that sets it apart. Mazda’s dial-operated infotainment system is simple to use, and the HVAC controls are situated below it in their own section of the dashboard. No more turning on the seat warmer when you’re trying to hit preset radio station number 4!

What’s important is that the CX-5 boasts a tighter steering ratio than the other two entrants, and that makes it as much fun to drive as cars with fewer doors and much lower ground clearances.

What’s important is that the CX-5 boasts a tighter steering ratio than the other two entrants, and that makes it as much fun to drive as cars with fewer doors and much lower ground clearances.

The handsome “Almond” leather interior is one of the best-looking and nicest-feeling this side of a luxury car, and there’s plenty of space for all occupants and cargo, though admittedly less than the Honda. Unless you’re moving apartments every weekend, I figure you can live without the extra room.

Add in the fact that, like the Honda, it’s an Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) Top Safety Pick+, and there are few reasons not to at least consider the CX-5 when shopping for your next crossover.

And be sure to go for a test drive. You’ll thank me later.

Add in the fact that the CX-5 is an Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) Top Safety Pick+, and there are few reasons not to at least consider the CX-5 when shopping for your next crossover.

Add in the fact that the CX-5 is an Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) Top Safety Pick+, and there are few reasons not to at least consider the CX-5 when shopping for your next crossover.

Vital Stats: 2016 Mazda CX-5 Grand Touring AWD

Price: $32,640 (as tested, incl. $880 dest. charge)

Powertrain: All-wheel drive; 2.5-liter SKYACTIV 4-cyl.; 6-speed automatic

Power: 184-hp; 185 lb.-ft.

Fuel economy (mpg): 24 city/30 hwy./26 comb.

Safety: 5-star NHTSA overall; IIHS Top Safety Pick+

Come see and drive one today at Oxmoor Auto Group‘s Oxmoor Mazda of Louisville.

Want To Buy The 2017 Ford GT? You Will Have To Prove You’re Worth It

Ford is prioritizing loyal Ford customers in its vetting process toward the ownership of the upcoming 2017 Ford GT.

The company said that buying the all-new supercar, which is slated to go on sale at the end of 2016, will involve a pre-selling online application for potential customers. However, the whole process is not going to be very easy.

“This is going to be the rarest Ford model that we’ve ever done,”said Raj Nair, Ford Global Product Development chief, at the Ford GT National Rally 10 held in September 2015.

Nair went on to explain how the company plans to hold the new Ford GT ownership program.

“It’s gonna be a program that’s gonna commence at the beginning of next year,” said Nair at the time. “First, the next generation Ford GT will be assigned on a customer basis. … Anyone can apply, but priority is going to be given to loyal Ford customers including current Ford GT owners.”

2017 Ford GT

 

Other key takeaways suggested in the announcement include how the new Ford GT will be assigned to the customer by Ford and how the customer can choose a certified Ford GT dealer in terms of the delivery of his vehicle.

With only 250 Ford GT cars to produce in a year globally, the company wants to make sure that its cars will be in the hands of true Ford and Ford GT fans.

The buying process starts with an online application. Next, hopeful soon-to-be owners have to be prepared to be “scrutinized” through questions such as the Ford models they already own, how often they are planning to drive the Ford GT, and their social media activity.

Nair explained that the process is meant to ensure that the cars will be used on the road as opposed to being used as a display in one’s museum at home. Customers are also discouraged to own the car just briefly and then re-sell it to the highest bidder.

Applicants will be asked to sign a legal document in order to prevent them from buying the car and then selling it for a profit.

Likewise, Ford Dealership owners who are also interested in applying and owning a new Ford GT will have to undergo a separate process.

The application page for the all-new collector model 2017 Ford GT is expected to go live sometime in February this year.

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Oxmoor Auto Group’s Oxmoor Chrysler of Louisville and the 2017 Chrysler Pacifica

The all new 2017 Oxmoor Chrysler of Louisville’s new 2017 Chrysler Pacifica to replace the 2016 Chrysler Town and Country.

2017 Oxmoor Chrysler of Louisville Pacifica

This is not simply a model change, but a game changer in the minivan battle, which has been largely between the Honda Odyssey and the Toyota Sienna.  The 2017 Chrysler Pacifica will be changing all of that, and will be coming to Oxmoor Chrysler this Spring!

Interior of the 2017 Oxmoor Chrysler Pacifica

See you soon at Oxmoor Auto Group‘s Oxmoor Chrysler of Louisville!

Oxmoor Chrysler

4520 Shelbyville Rd, Louisville, KY 40207

(502) 895-4520